Feline Coat Colours

Cats display a wide variety of coat colours and patterns. Classification of these colours can be confusing sometimes because different registries or associations may use different names for the same colour. Several genes determine the coat colour of a cat. Unfortunately not for all genes involved the genetic background is known yet. For the genes known as A-, B-, D-, C-, and E-loci the genetic background is known and a DNA-test is offered at VHLGenetics to determine the genetic status of those genes. For the G-locus (White gloves), the S-locus (spotting) and the W-locus (albino) VHLGenetics doesn’t offer a DNA-test yet. For the O-locus (Orange), I-locus (Inhibitor) and the T-locus (Ticked) the genetic background is not known yet and therefore it is not possible to determine the genetic status of those genes with a DNA-test.

Within the above described coat colour genes, four genes explain the major differences; the B-, D-, C- and O-Locus genes. In the table below the possible combinations of these genes are indicated.

B-locus

D-locus

C-Locus

O-locus

Coat Colour

B/B, B/b or B/b’

D/D or D/d

C/C or C/cb, C/cs

o/o (female) or o/- (male)

Black

B/B, B/b or B/b’

d/d

C/C or C/cb, C/cs

o/o (female) or o/- (male)

Blue

b/b or b/b’

D/D or D/d

C/C or C/cb, C/cs

o/o (female) or o/- (male)

Brown, chocolate

b/b or b/b’

d/d

C/C or C/cb, C/cs

o/o (female) or o/- (male

Lilac

b’/b’

D/D or D/d

C/C or C/cb, C/cs

o/o (female) or o/- (male

Cinnamon, Red

b’/b’

d/d

C/C or C/cb, C/cs

o/o (female) or o/- (male

Fawn

B/B, B/b, B/b’, b/b, b/b', b'/b'

D/D or D/d

C/C or C/cb, C/cs

O/O (female) or O/- (male)

Orange, Red, Yellow

B/B, B/b, B/b’, b/b, b/b', b'/b'

d/d

C/C or C/cb, C/cs

O/O (female) or O/- (male

Cream

B/B, B/b, B/b’, b/b, b/b', b'/b'

D/D or D/d

C/C or C/cb, C/cs

O/o (female) or O/o/- (male XXY)

Tortoiseshell (tortie), Calico

B/B, B/b, B/b’, b/b, b/b', b'/b'

d/d

C/C or C/cb, C/cs

O/o (female) or O/o/- (male XXY)

Blue-cream, Blue tortie

B/B, B/b or B/b’

D/D or D/d

cb/cb

o/o (female) or o/- (male)

Sable, Seal Sepia

B/B, B/b or B/b’

d/d

cb/cb

o/o (female) or o/- (male)

Blue Sepia

b/b or b/b’

D/D or D/d

cb/cb

o/o (female) or o/- (male)

Chocolate Sepia, Champagne

b/b or b/b’

d/d

cb/cb

o/o (female) or o/- (male

Lilac Sepia, Platinum

b’/b’

D/D or D/d

cb/cb

o/o (female) or o/- (male

Cinnamon Sepia

b’/b’

d/d

cb/cb

o/o (female) or o/- (male

Fawn Sepia

B/B, B/b, B/b’, b/b, b/b', b'/b'

D/D or D/d

cb/cb

O/O (female) or O/- (male)

Red Sepia

B/B, B/b, B/b’, b/b, b/b', b'/b'

d/d

cb/cb

O/O (female) or O/- (male

Cream Sepia

B/B, B/b, B/b’, b/b, b/b', b'/b'

D/D or D/d

cb/cb

O/o (female) or O/o/- (male XXY)

Tortoiseshell (tortie), Calico

B/B, B/b, B/b’, b/b, b/b', b'/b'

d/d

cb/cb

O/o (female) or O/o/- (male XXY)

Blue-cream, Blue tortie

B/B, B/b or B/b’

D/D or D/d

cb/cs

o/o (female) or o/- (male)

Seal Mink, Natural Mink

B/B, B/b or B/b’

d/d

cb/cs

o/o (female) or o/- (male)

Blue Mink

b/b or b/b’

D/D or D/d

cb/cs

o/o (female) or o/- (male)

Chocolate Mink, Champagne Mink

b/b or b/b’

d/d

cb/cs

o/o (female) or o/- (male

Lilac Mink, Platinum Mink

b’/b’

D/D or D/d

cb/cs

o/o (female) or o/- (male

Cinnamon Mink, Honey Mink

b’/b’

d/d

cb/cs

o/o (female) or o/- (male

Fawn Mink

B/B, B/b, B/b’, b/b, b/b', b'/b'

D/D or D/d

cb/cs

O/O (female) or O/- (male)

Red Mink

B/B, B/b, B/b’, b/b, b/b', b'/b'

d/d

cb/cs

O/O (female) or O/- (male

Cream Mink

B/B, B/b, B/b’, b/b, b/b', b'/b'

D/D or D/d

cb/cs

O/o (female) or O/o/- (male XXY)

Tortoiseshell (tortie), Calico

B/B, B/b, B/b’, b/b, b/b', b'/b'

d/d

cb/cs

O/o (female) or O/o/- (male XXY)

Blue-cream, Blue tortie

B/B, B/b or B/b’

D/D or D/d

cs/cs

o/o (female) or o/- (male)

Seal Point

B/B, B/b or B/b’

d/d

cs/cs

o/o (female) or o/- (male)

Blue Point

b/b or b/b’

D/D or D/d

cs/cs

o/o (female) or o/- (male)

Chocolate Point

b/b or b/b’

d/d

cs/cs

o/o (female) or o/- (male

Lilac Point, Platinum Point

b’/b’

D/D or D/d

cs/cs

o/o (female) or o/- (male

Cinnamon Point

b’/b’

d/d

cs/cs

o/o (female) or o/- (male

Fawn Point

B/B, B/b, B/b’, b/b, b/b', b'/b'

D/D or D/d

cs/cs

O/O (female) or O/- (male)

Red Point

B/B, B/b, B/b’, b/b, b/b', b'/b'

d/d

cs/cs

O/O (female) or O/- (male

Cream Point

B/B, B/b, B/b’, b/b, b/b', b'/b'

D/D or D/d

cs/cs

O/o (female) or O/o/- (male XXY)

Tortoiseshell (tortie), Calico

B/B, B/b, B/b’, b/b, b/b', b'/b'

d/d

cs/cs

O/o (female) or O/o/- (male XXY)

Blue-cream, Blue tortie

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COAT COLOURS

A-Locus: K757 Coat Colour Agouti

The Agouti gene (ASIP gene) is responsible for the production of a protein that regulates the distribution of black pigment (eumelanin) within the hair shaft. This gene is also known as the A-locus and is responsible for ticking and causes the individual hairs to have bands of light and heavy pigmentation. The agouti band can be seen in both black-based and red-based colours. The Coat Colour Agouti test (K757) tests for the genetic status of the A-locus. The A-locus has two variants (alleles). The allele A is dominant and produces ticked coat, hair shafts with alternating bands of yellow and black colour, ending with black tips (similar to the coat of a wild mouse or rabbit).The recessive allele produces a cat that is “self”coloured (solid). Only when the cat has two copies of the recessive allele a the coat colour is solid.

Another system of pigmentation in cats produces the tabby patterns of dark stripes interspersed with the lighter agouti tipped hairs. Hairs in the darker stripes do not have the shift between black and yellow pigment production and remain uniformly dark. The effect of the agouti protein on orange pigment is limited, thus tabby striping may still be seen on cats that are a/a for agouti.

The Coat Colour Agouti test (A-Locus) enclose the following results: 

A-locus

Coat Colour

A/A

Agouti coat colour

A/a

Agouti coat colour

a/a

Solid, “Self” coloured

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B-locus: K755 Coat Colour Cinnamon and K756 Coat Colour Chocolate

The coat colours black, chocolate/brown and cinnamon/red are controlled by the gene TYRP1 (tyrosinase-related protein 1) which is involved in the production of the black colour pigment eumelanin. This gene locus is also called the B-locus. The Coat Colour Cinnamon (K755) and Coat Colour Chocolate (K756) combined reveal the genetic status of the B-locus. The B-locus has three variants (alleles). The B allele is dominant over the alleles b and b’; allele b is dominant over allele b’. The dominant allele B results in a black coat colour. The allele b in a chocolate/brown colour and the allele b’ results in a cinnamon/red coat colour.

The Coat Colour Cinnamon and Coat Colour Chocolate tests (together B-locus) enclose the following results:

Chocolate

Cinnamon

B-locus

Coat Colour

N/N

N/N

B/B

Black

N/N

N/b’

B/b’

Black

N/N

b’/b’

b’/b’

Cinnamon/Red

N/b

N/N

B/b

Black

N/b

N/b’

b/b’

Brown/chocolate

b/b

N/N

b/b

Brown/chocolate

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D-locus: K760 Coat Colour Dilution

The dilute gene (MLPH gene) is responsible for the intensity of the coat colour by affecting the amount of pigments in the hair shaft. This gene is also known as the D-locus and dilutes all colours. The Coat Colour Dilution test (K760) tests for the genetic status of the D-locus. The D-locus has two variants (alleles). The allele D is dominant and does not have an effect on the coat colour. Only when the cat has two copies of the recessive allele d the coat colour is diluted. The dilution of black results in grey, called blue by cat breeders. Chocolate/brown dilutes into lilac, it is described as dove or light taupe gray, and is sometimes called frost or lavender. Cinnamon dilutes into Fawn, it is described as "coffee and cream" or caramel color. Some cat breeds are fixed for one of the alleles. The Egyptian Mau and Singapura are fixed for the dominant allele D. The breeds Chartreux, Korat and Russian Blue are fixed for the recessive allele d. Most other breeds can have both alleles.

The Coat Colour Dilution test encloses the following results, in this scheme the results of the Coat Colour Dilution test are shown in combination with the possible results for the B-locus):

D-locus

B-locus

Coat Colour

D/D

B/B, B/b or B/b’

Black

D/D

b/b or b/b’

Brown, chocolate

D/D

b’/b’

Cinnamon, Red

D/d

B/B, B/b or B/b’

Black

D/d

b/b or b/b’

Brown, chocolate

D/d

b’/b’

Cinnamon, Red

d/d

B/B, B/b or B/b’

Blue

d/d

b/b or b/b’

Lilac

d/d

b’/b’

Fawn

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C-locus: K758 Coat Colour Siamese and K759 Coat Colour Burmese

The Siamese and Burmese coat patterns are controlled by the gene TYR (tyrosinase) which produces an enzyme that is required for melanin production. The Burmese pattern is a result from reduced pigment production changing black pigment to sepia and orange to yellow. The Burmese points are darker than the body and the eyes are yellow-gray or yellow-green. The Siamese pattern shows reduced pigment production to the points and the eyes are blue. This gene is also known as Color gene or C-locus. The Coat Colour Siamese (K758) and Coat Colour Burmese (K759) combined reveal the genetic status of the C-locus. The C-locus has three variants (alleles). The C allele is dominant over the alleles cb and cs; allele cb is semi-dominant over allele cs. The dominant allele C does not have an effect on the coat colour. Two copies of the cb allele (homozygous cb/cb) results in a Burmese coat pattern. One copy of the allele cb and one copy of the allele cs (cb/cs) result in the intermediate mink colour. Two copies of the cs allele (cs/cs) results in a Siamese coat pattern.

The Coat Colour Siamese and Coat Colour Burmese tests (together C-locus) enclose the following results:

Siamese

Burmese

C-locus

Coat Colour

N/N

N/N

C/C

Full colour

N/N

N/cb

C/cb

Full colour

N/N

cb/cb

cb/cb

Burmese / Sepia

N/cs

N/N

C/cs

Full colour

N/cs

N/cb

cb/cs

Tonkinese / Mink

cs/cs

N/N

cs/cs

Siamese / Pointed

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In the following scheme the results of the C-locus are shown in combination with the possible results for the B-locus and D-locus:

C-Locus

B-locus

D-locus

Coat Colour

C/C

B/B, B/b or B/b’

D/D or D/d

Black

C/C

B/B, B/b or B/b’

d/d

Blue

C/C

b/b or b/b’

D/D or D/d

Brown, chocolate

C/C

b/b or b/b’

d/d

Lilac

C/C

b’/b’

D/D or D/d

Cinnamon, Red

C/C

b’/b’

d/d

Fawn

C/cb

B/B, B/b or B/b’

D/D or D/d

Black

C/cb

B/B, B/b or B/b’

d/d

Blue

C/cb

b/b or b/b’

D/D or D/d

Brown, chocolate

C/cb

b/b or b/b’

d/d

Lilac

C/cb

b’/b’

D/D or D/d

Cinnamon, Red

C/cb

b’/b’

d/d

Fawn

C/cs

B/B, B/b or B/b’

D/D or D/d

Black

C/cs

B/B, B/b or B/b’

d/d

Blue

C/cs

b/b or b/b’

D/D or D/d

Brown, chocolate

C/cs

b/b or b/b’

d/d

Lilac

C/cs

b’/b’

D/D or D/d

Cinnamon, Red

C/cs

b’/b’

d/d

Fawn

cb/cb

B/B, B/b or B/b’

D/D or D/d

Sable, Seal Sepia

cb/cb

B/B, B/b or B/b’

d/d

Blue Sepia

cb/cb

b/b or b/b’

D/D or D/d

Chocolate Sepia, Champagne

cb/cb

b/b or b/b’

d/d

Lilac Sepia, Platinum

cb/cb

b’/b’

D/D or D/d

Cinnamon Sepia

cb/cb

b’/b’

d/d

Fawn Sepia

cb/cs

B/B, B/b or B/b’

D/D or D/d

Seal Mink, Natural Mink

cb/cs

B/B, B/b or B/b’

d/d

Blue Mink

cb/cs

b/b or b/b’

D/D or D/d

Chocolate Mink, Champagne Mink

cb/cs

b/b or b/b’

d/d

Lilac Mink, Platinum Mink

cb/cs

b’/b’

D/D or D/d

Cinnamon Mink, Honey Mink

cb/cs

b’/b’

d/d

Fawn Mink

cs/cs

B/B, B/b or B/b’

D/D or D/d

Seal Point

cs/cs

B/B, B/b or B/b’

d/d

Blue Point

cs/cs

b/b or b/b’

D/D or D/d

Chocolate Point

cs/cs

b/b or b/b’

d/d

Lilac Point, Platinum Point

cs/cs

b’/b’

D/D or D/d

Cinnamon Point

cs/cs

b’/b’

d/d

Fawn Point

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E-Locus: K639 Coat Colour E locus, extension

The Extension gene (MCR1 gene) controls the production of black and red pigment. In cats, shades of red color are determined by the dominant Orange gene (O-locus) located on the X chromosome. The genetic background of the O-Locus is still unknown. The Extension gene is also known as E-locus. The Coat Colour E locus, extension test (K639) tests for the genetic status of the E-locus. The E-locus has two variants (alleles). It is presumed that (almost) all cats are fixed for the dominant allele E, they have two copies of the dominant allele E and based on this gene alone could produce both red and black pigment. The recessive allele e results in kittens that are born with a black/brown tabby pattern (blue/apricot in dilute cats). As the kittens mature, the black/blue pigment is replaced by yellow resulting in the golden coat coloration seen in adult cats. Originally it was named X Colour, now it is called Amber. The recessive allele can be present in the Norwegian Forest cat and traces back to a single female ancestor from Norway born in 1981. Cats with two copies of the allele e only have the Amber Coat Colour when the dominant O allele at the O-locus is not present.

The Coat Colour E Locus, extension test encloses the following results, in this scheme the results of the Coat Colour E Locus, extension test are shown in combination with the possible results for the O-locus. For the O-locus no DNA test is available:

E-locus

O-locus (no DNA test available)

Coat Colour

E/E

O/O, O/o or o/o (female)

Not Amber

E/E

O/- or o/- (male)

Not Amber

E/e

O/O, O/o or o/o (female)

Not Amber

E/e

O/- or o/- (male)

Not Amber

e/e

o/o (female) or o/- (male)

Amber

e/e

O/O (female) or O/- (male)

Red

e/e

O/o (female)

Amber/red tortoiseshell

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G-Locus: White Gloves, KIT Gene

Unfortunately, for this coat colour no DNA-test has been described in the scientific literature yet. As the inheritance of the coat colour may be only partially defined, for a description of coat colour G-Locus we refer to Lyons LA., (2015) DNA mutations of the cat: the good, the bad and the ugly. J Feline Med Surg 17, 203-219.

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S-Locus: Spotting, KIT Gene

Unfortunately, for this coat colour no DNA-test is available at VHLgenetics yet. As the mutation causing spotting has been described in literature VHLgenetics is currently investigating the possibilities to set-up a DNA test.

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W-Locus: K303 Coat colour W-locus (Dominant White KIT gene)

Information about this test will follow soon.

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O-Locus: Orange

Unfortunately, for this coat colour no DNA-test has been described in the scientific literature yet. As the inheritance of the coat colour may be only partially defined, for a description of coat colour O-Locus we refer to Lyons LA., (2015) DNA mutations of the cat: the good, the bad and the ugly. J Feline Med Surg 17, 203-219.

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I-Locus: Inhibitor

Unfortunately, for this coat colour no DNA-test has been described in the scientific literature yet. As the inheritance of the coat colour may be only partially defined, for a description of coat colour I-Locus we refer to Lyons LA., (2015) DNA mutations of the cat: the good, the bad and the ugly. J Feline Med Surg 17, 203-219.

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T-Locus: Ticked

Unfortunately, for this coat colour no DNA-test has been described in the scientific literature yet. As the inheritance of the coat colour may be only partially defined, for a description of coat colour T-Locus we refer to Lyons LA., (2015) DNA mutations of the cat: the good, the bad and the ugly. J Feline Med Surg 17, 203-219.

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K306 Coat colour Russet (Burmese)

Information about this test will follow soon.

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COAT VARIATION:

The Fibroblast Growth Factor 5 (FGF5) determines the hair length. Four mutations in FGF5 have been identified that influence hair length in different breeds. There are breed specific mutations for Ragdolls, Norwegian Forest Cats and Main Coons and an different mutation has been found that influences hair length in all long-haired cat breeds. In the table below the possible combinations of these mutations are indicated.

Ragdoll mutation

Norwegian Forest mutation

Maine Coon mutation

all breeds mutation

FGF5 Gene

Hair Length

N/N

N/N

N/N

N/N

N/N

Short

N/M1

N/N

N/N

N/N

N/M1

Short

N/N

N/M2

N/N

N/N

N/M2

Short

N/N

N/N

N/M3

N/N

N/M3

Short

N/N

N/N

N/N

N/M4

N/M4

Short

M1/M1

N/N

N/N

N/N

M1/M1

Long

N/M1

N/M2

N/N

N/N

M1/M2

Long

N/M1

N/N

N/M3

N/N

M1/M3

Long

N/M1

N/N

N/N

N/M4

M1/M4

Long

N/N

M2/M2

N/N

N/N

M2/M2

Long

N/N

N/M2

N/M3

N/N

M2/M3

Long

N/N

N/M2

N/N

N/M4

M2/M4

Long

N/N

N/N

M3/M3

N/N

M3/M3

Long

N/N

N/N

N/M3

N/M4

M3/M4

Long

N/N

N/N

N/N

M4/M4

M4/M4

Long

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K502 Cornish Rex, Curly/woolly coat

The lysophosphatidic acid receptor 6 (LPAR6) gene influences the hair formation. The Cornish Rex, Curly/woolly coat test (K502) tests for the genetic status of the LPAR6 gene. The LPAR6 gene has two variants (alleles). The allele N is dominant and does not have an effect on the coat. Only when the cat has two copies of the recessive allele CC the coat is curly/woolly. The mutation is fixed in Cornish Rex cats. The test can be used in outcrossing programs, to help breeders select the cats that can produce curly coat in the next generation.

The Cornish Rex, Curly/woolly coat test encloses the following results:

Result Cornish Rex, Curly/woolly coat test

Coat

CC/CC

Curly coat, unless modified by another mutation influencing hair formation

N/CC

Normal coat, unless modified by another mutation influencing hair formation

N/N

Normal coat, unless modified by another mutation influencing hair formation

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K304 Devon Rex, Curly Coat and K305 Sphynx, Hairless Coat

Two different mutations in the Keratin 71 (KRT71) gene influence the hair formation in Devon Rex and Sphynx cats resulting in a curly coat or a nearly hairless coat. The Devon Rex, Curly Coat (K304) and Sphynx, Hairless Coat (K305) tests combined reveal the genetic status of the KRT71 gene. The KRT71 gene has three variants (alleles). The N allele is dominant over the alleles hr and dr; allele hr is dominant over allele dr. The dominant allele N does not have an effect on the coat type. Two copies of the hr allele (homozygous hr/hr) or one copy of the hr allele in combination with one copy of the dr allele (heterozygous hr/dr) results in a nearly hairless coat. Two copies of the dr allele (dr/dr) results in a curly coat. For Sphynx breeders, the tests identify hairless cats that carry the curly mutation and therefore, depending on the mate, might get offspring with a curly coat.

The Devon Rex, Curly Coat and Sphynx, Hairless Coat tests (together KRT71 gene) enclose the following results:

Devon Rex, Curly

Sphynx, Hairless

KRT71 gene

Coat

N/N

N/N

N/N

Normal coat, unless modified by another mutation influencing hair formation

N/N

N/hr

N/hr

Normal coat, unless modified by another mutation influencing hair formation

N/N

hr/hr

hr/hr

Nearly hairless coat, unless modified by another mutation influencing hair formation

N/dr

N/N

N/dr

Normal coat, unless modified by another mutation influencing hair formation

N/dr

N/hr

hr/dr

Nearly hairless coat, unless modified by another mutation influencing hair formation

dr/dr

N/N

dr/dr

Curly coat, unless modified by another mutation influencing hair formation

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K466 Hair Length all breeds

The Fibroblast Growth Factor 5 (FGF5) determines the hair length. Four mutations in FGF5 have been identified that influence hair length in different breeds. There are breed specific mutations for Ragdolls, Norwegian Forest Cats and Main Coons and an different mutation has been found that influences hair length in all long-haired cat breeds. The Hair Length all breeds test (K466) tests for the mutation that is not breed specific in the FGF5-gene and has two variants (alleles). The mutation can be present in all long-haired cat breeds. The recessive allele results in long hair and the dominant allele results in short hair.

The Hair Length all breeds test encloses the following results:

Result Hair Length all breeds test

Hair Length

M4/M4

Long Hair, unless modified by another mutation influencing hair length

N/M4

Short Hair, unless modified by another mutation influencing hair length

N/N

Short Hair, unless modified by another mutation influencing hair length

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K461 Hair Length Maine Coon

The Fibroblast Growth Factor 5 (FGF5) determines the hair length. Four mutations in FGF5 have been identified that influence hair length in different breeds. There are breed specific mutations for Ragdolls, Norwegian Forest Cats and Main Coons and an different mutation has been found that influences hair length in all long-haired cat breeds. The Hair Length Maine Coon test (K461) tests for the Main Coon specific mutation in the FGF5-gene and has two variants (alleles). This mutation can also be present in Ragdolls. The recessive allele results in long hair and the dominant allele results in short hair.

The Hair Length Maine Coon test encloses the following results:

Result Hair Length Maine Coon test

Hair Length

M3/M3

Long Hair, unless modified by another mutation influencing hair length

N/M3

Short Hair, unless modified by another mutation influencing hair length

N/N

Short Hair, unless modified by another mutation influencing hair length

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K462 Hair Length Norwegian Forest

The Fibroblast Growth Factor 5 (FGF5) determines the hair length. Four mutations in FGF5 have been identified that influence hair length in different breeds. There are breed specific mutations for Ragdolls, Norwegian Forest Cats and Main Coons and an different mutation has been found that influences hair length in all long-haired cat breeds. The Hair Length Norwegian Forest test (K462) tests for the Norwegian Forest cat specific mutation in the FGF5-gene and has two variants (alleles). The recessive allele results in long hair and the dominant allele results in short hair.

The Hair Length Norwegian Forest test encloses the following results:

Result Hair Length Norwegian Forest test

Hair Length

M2/M2

Long Hair, unless modified by another mutation influencing hair length

N/M2

Short Hair, unless modified by another mutation influencing hair length

N/N

Short Hair, unless modified by another mutation influencing hair length

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K463 Hair Length Ragdoll

The Fibroblast Growth Factor 5 (FGF5) determines the hair length. Four mutations in FGF5 have been identified that influence hair length in different breeds. There are breed specific mutations for Ragdolls, Norwegian Forest Cats and Main Coons and an different mutation has been found that influences hair length in all long-haired cat breeds. The Hair Length Ragdoll test (K463) tests for the Ragdoll specific mutation in the FGF5-gene and has two variants (alleles). The recessive allele results in long hair and the dominant allele results in short hair.

The Hair Length Ragdoll test encloses the following results:

Result Hair Length Ragdoll test

Hair Length

M1/M1

Long Hair, unless modified by another mutation influencing hair length

N/M1

Short Hair, unless modified by another mutation influencing hair length

N/N

Short Hair, unless modified by another mutation influencing hair length

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Date: 30 May 2017, version 6